Philippians 2:7, But made himself [Jesus] of no reputation, and took upon him the form of a servant, and was made in the likeness of men”
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The words to this great hymn were written by Catherine Hankey, born January 12, 1834, the daughter of banker Thomas Hankey. She belonged to an evangelical group known as the Clapham Sect. The group was mainly known for its anti-slavery and pro-missionary stances. While still a teenager, Hankey taught Sunday school for girls. Later, she traveled to South Africa to be a nurse, and to help her invalid brother. In her early 30’s, Hankey contracted a severe illness. During her protracted recovery, she wrote a long poem about Jesus. It is in two parts, with the first, 50 stanzas in length, asking about Him, and the second answering the question. I Love to Tell the Story and Tell Me the Old, Old Story both come from this poem. As of 1881, Hankey was living with her unmarried brother Reginald at 78 Ebury Street, London, Middlesex. She died in London, England on May 9, 1911. I can remember singing this hymn as a young child growing up in West Virginia. So my brethren, I trust you will enjoy the words of this hymn, which speak so clearly of His love for you and me!

I love to tell the story of unseen things above,
Of Jesus and His glory, of Jesus and His love.
I love to tell the story, because I know ’tis true;
It satisfies my longings as nothing else can do.

Refrain

I love to tell the story, ’twill be my theme in glory,
To tell the old, old story of Jesus and His love.

I love to tell the story; more wonderful it seems
Than all the golden fancies of all our golden dreams.
I love to tell the story, it did so much for me;
And that is just the reason I tell it now to thee.

Refrain

I love to tell the story, ’twill be my theme in glory,
To tell the old, old story of Jesus and His love.

I love to tell the story; ’tis pleasant to repeat
What seems, each time I tell it, more wonderfully sweet.
I love to tell the story, for some have never heard
The message of salvation from God’s own holy Word.

Refrain

I love to tell the story, ’twill be my theme in glory,
To tell the old, old story of Jesus and His love.

I love to tell the story, for those who know it best
Seem hungering and thirsting to hear it like the rest.
And when, in scenes of glory, I sing the new, new song,
’Twill be the old, old story that I have loved so long.

Refrain

I love to tell the story, ’twill be my theme in glory,
To tell the old, old story of Jesus and His love.
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Further thoughts:

Do you love to tell the story of Jesus Christ and His love? “Suppose there was a king who loved a humble maiden,” begins a parable by Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard (1813-1855). How could he declare his love for her? She might respond out of fear or coercion, but he wanted her to love him for himself. So the king, convinced that he could not appear as a king without crushing his loved one’s freedom, resolved to descend. He stepped off his throne, took off his royal robes, and wrapped himself in a shabby cloak. It was no mere disguise, but a new identity. He took on the life of a servant to win the young woman’s hand. What a gamble! She might love him or she might spurn him and send him away, and he would lose her love forever! But that’s a picture of the choice God gave to mankind, and that, of course, is what the parable is all about. Our Lord humbled Himself in an effort to win our love. “Christ Jesus, who, being in the form of God, did not consider it robbery to be equal with God, but made Himself of no reputation” (Philippians 2:5-7). That is the story of Christmas: God in a manger; God found in a form that no one could possibly fear. The question that remains would be:

(1) Will we love Him, or will we spurn Him and send Him away?

Invite Him in this Christmas,
This Savior from above;
The gift He seeks you need not wrap;
He only wants your love – Berg
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Christ opens the door of heaven to those who open their heart to Him.

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